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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also be historic. weather forecasters predict it will leave up to three feet of snow in a wide swath stretching from new york to boston. preparations are well underway. airlines cancelled nearly 4,500 flights, leaving many travelers stranded. >> here at laguardia, as you can see, our port authority men and women are hard at work preparing for the storm. our fleet of snow removal vehicles and sand and agent spreaders are prepped and ready for action. >> reporter: amtrak has also canceled many trips in the northeast. the storm is expected to deliver a harsh blow to areas of the east coast still recovering from superstorm sandy. >> hurricane sandy cost the economy a $100 billion and the recovery efforts are still
: in new york city and elsewhere, preparations are being made for clean-up. >> we have more than 250,000 tons of salt on hand. >> reporter: according to the long island power authority, the storm has the potential to cause power outages for 100,000 customers on long island. and for the first time ever, lipa is deferring storm operations and response to its subcontractor, national grid. but in manhattan today, it was mostly business as usual, although many workers did try to leave early to beat the snow. and if the snowfall is anywhere close to the storm of '78, you'll see the impact in economic data in the weeks ahead. >> usually major storms cause increased volatility in economic data. so, that jobless claims jump significantly in the beginning as government offices close, because of the storm. and they surge back up after the offices reopened. >> reporter: if there's a silver lining in this storm, it's the timing. the heaviest snowfall will happen over the weekend. and the clean-up is expected well before valentines day, which contributes $18 billion to the economy. erika miller,
is that the price gains were widespread throughout the nation-- 19 out of 20 cities posted increases. the lone exception was new york city, where prices dipped a half a percent. there was more data today reaffirming the housing market recovery. new home sales surged almost 16% in january, lotore an expected and the biggest jump in nearly two decades. so what's behind the turnaround in the housing market? >> the biggest factor is just the fact that prices have fallen to such a level that there are enough willing buyers that see value in this market to come in and basically provide a floor. >> reporter: in fact, investors continue to purchase about nearly one out of every five homes. many real estate experts predict home prices will continue to rise this year, fueled by a dwindling number of properties on the market. in january, the supply of homes for sale fell to its lowest level in nearly eight years. for most people, the biggest impediment to buying a home is not credit score or income. >> it's down payment. most people don't have enough spare cash laying around that they are able to qualify
, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why the super bowl blackout means it's time for the cities that host professional sports teams to focus on the basics. >> tom: stocks were back in the green after suffering their biggest sell-off in months yesterday. one encouraging sign came from the service sector. the non-manufacturing index slipped in january from december, but not as much as feared, according to the institute of supply management. the employment index was at its highest level in almost seven years. the dow gained 100, the nasdaq increased 40, the s&p was up almost 16. >> susie: the u.s. government made it official today. it filed a suit against standard and poors' credit agency for giving optimistic ratings on troubled securities that later failed and contributed to the financial crisis. the justice department could seek as much as $5 billion from s&p. it claims that's the amount of money federally insured financial institutions lost because of s&p's alleged wrongdoing. the government claims s&p ratings services knowingly executed a "scheme to defraud investors." >> duri
high from hosting the super bowl. the city's tourism officials say one million people are in town for the festivities. now, that's more than five times as many people who showed up for the super bowl. new orleans' economy took a big hit when hurricane katrina struck in 2005, but these big turnouts are helping its economic comeback. >> tourism is our most important industry. it's a $5 billion industry for new orleans. it employs 75,000 of our local citizens, so it is absolutely critical that we continue to do events like mardi gras, super bowls, final fours, big conventions, business meetings. that is the lifeblood of the city. >> susie: she also says this year's mardi gras is expected to bring in almost $150 million and that the planning never stops. tomorrow, new orleans will start working on mardi gras 2014. well, that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, february 12. have a great evening, everyone. we'll see you online at www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.c
for her new york city apartment. she is recuperating from the chicken pox and concussion. >> i talk back to you. i complain to you. i join the hot topics. i do everything. >> barbara gave details for the first time of how she contracted chicken pox from a guest at a new year's eve dinner party in florida. >> what happened was that i had a temperature and i had the chicken pox and didn't know it. and so when i was in washington for the inauguration weekend, i fainted. and i hit my head and had six stitches. >> wasn't photographer caught up with her last week, she was steady on her feet after visiting her doctor but she told her co-hosts she won't be well enough to return to work for at least three weeks. >> get better quickly, darlen. and we miss you. >> we love you. >> bye-bye. >>> we will be back with more after this. >>> next, people who look like twins but they are not even related. >> double the pleasure, double the fun. >>> they have been best friends since high school. they met at a store. >> can you believe these guys actually work in the same office. >> then, oscar nominees as yo
, maybe two. peak travel to key cities could be snarled by late march. smaller airports may have to shut down altogether. you can find the list on the department of transportation's website. the administration denies these announcements are part of a campaign to pressure house republicans to change course and head off the cuts. >> the idea that we are doing this to create some kind of horrific scare tactic is nonsense. we are required to cut a billion dollars. and if more than half of our employees are at the f.a.a., the f.a.a.-- there has to be some impact. >> reporter: and the f.a.a. cuts don't include potential delays from cutbacks as t.s.a. furloughs employees. the defense department has already informed 800,000 workers they may be furloughed and face a 20% paycut as it struggles to find a way to cut $46 billion from its budget. adding it all up, the president warns the picture is not pretty. >> the overall impact to the recovery will be to slow down the recovery. and not only may there end up being direct job loss, but, because the economy is softer, it also means that we're not goi
more powerfully than its religion, and the african american inner city is strong and growing strong under jim crow. monday night at 10:00 on mpt. >> catch a free look at upcoming programs and events and find it online. >> programs on
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)